Resources for Parents of College-Bound Students Challenges for the college-bound student

 

 

Resources


College applications

Codes

At various stages in the application process, you will need certain codes:

  • CEEB codes. You will need these codes for submitting letters of recommendation (LORs) — i.e., teachers and professors writing LORs for your student will need the code for the institution where they teach (not where the child is applying) and often have difficult finding it. "CEEB," by the way, stands for College Entrance Examination Board, and each code is a unique identifier for academic institutions like high schools, colleges, etc. — The link provided here is to a CEEB-lookup engine provided by Rutgers.
  • Test codes. To register for standardized tests, students must have the unique code that identifies their high school. Homeschooled students will need the appropriate code that represents homeschooling:
    • SAT or SAT II — 970000
    • ACT — 969-999
    • PSAT or AP in CT — 990799
    • PSAT or AP in NY — 993499
    • For PSAT Codes for homeschoolers in other states, use this link.

Searching for scholarships

Be sure to
check your target
schools' websites
for scholarship
information, as well
as requirements
and deadlines
for applying
.

Here are some of the most popular search tools & sites for scholarships:

  • The College Board — Home of many standardized tests.
  • scholarshipjunkies.org — A site whose mission is to provide "support for anyone striving to access higher education."
  • finaid.org — A source for "student financial aid information, advice, and tools."
  • studentaid.ed.gov — Federal Student Aid, a part of the U.S. Department of Education, is the largest provider of student financial aid in the nation.
  • fafsa.ed.gov — Site of the "Free Application for Federal Student Aid" (FAFSA).
  • college-athletic-scholarship.com — Somewhat dated information to "help high school athletes realize their dreams of receiving a College Athletic Scholarship."

Important: Be sure to check your target schools' websites for scholarship information, as well as their requirements and deadlines for applying.

College planning

The College Board has created a site called "Big Future" with answers to a lot of basic questions — like choosing a college major and the steps involved in applying for financial aid.

Help with the Common App

You cannot reach anyone at the Common App by phone (they say the volume of calls would be "unsustainable"). Use this site when you have questions:
Common App | Applicant Help Center.

Another site you may find helpful:

  • College Essay Doctor — Ted Cleary. This site lists the actual personal essay prompts in the College App and offers suggestions for how to best answer them, i.e. frame them — the actual experiences or insights your student cites must be his or her own.

Calculating GPA

Here's a good site for figuring how to weight grades and calculate credits:
Back to College | GPA Calculator.

Preparing High School Transcripts

This document contains essential information on components of a high school transcript including how to assign grades, how to assign credits, and calculate GPA:
HSLDA | Preparing High School Transcripts.

HSLDA has also made available a series of sample transcripts to study when preparing your student's transcript — as well as a blank form that's easy to use:
HSLDA | Sample Transcripts.


Want to be notified of new courses or resources?

Just add yourself to our contact list here.

 

Training for parents


Homeschooling the
College-Bound Student

Live & online
The 2017 series will take place on
three consecutive Sundays:
Sun, February 26, 2017 4:00 – 5:30 PM EDT
Sun, March 5, 2017 4:00 – 5:30 PM EDT
Sun, March 12, 2017 4:00 – 5:30 PM EDT

Instructor: Diane Speed

Your one-stop-shopping resource of informationThis program addresses the principal concerns parents have about homeschooling through high school — everything you need to know about the high school curriculum and credits, standardized tests, transcripts and record-keeping, applying to college, pursuing scholarships, and much, much more.

Terrific. Full of information. The materials were so thorough. I now have a plan of action. Also, this workshop is inclusive: No matter what type of homeschooler you are, you will understand better how to prepare your student for college and present him or her in the best light.

Joni C.

To ask a question about the program
or to register, contact Diane Speed:
Tel. 203.744.2321
Email: dspeed@salientcomm.com

 

College prep for students


Shakespeare's Romeo & Juliet

Ten online classes

Instructor: Roy Speed

These online sessions provide an in-depth study of this play as well as the historical, cultural, and literary background needed to bring the play to life. As one of our College-Bound Intensives, this course is designed to take students to an advanced level of reading comprehension and analysis, enabling them to:

  • tackle sophisticated material across the spectrum of the college curriculum;
  • dissect difficult passages included in standardized tests.

For my daughter, the most helpful part of taking this class was reading through parts of the play, line by line, with Roy's guidance every step of the way. Through this experience, she has begun to understand how to read Shakespeare and has been inspired by him to read many of Shakespeare's plays on her own.

Vicki B.

 

  Copyright © 2014 - 2016 Diane and Roy Speed. All rights reserved.

Email us at info@hscollegebound.com